5 Familiar Workplace Bullies and How to Deal with Them

5 Familiar Workplace Bullies and How to Deal with Them

AGGRESSIVE JERK

These are bullies who usually call other people names. They possess a bombastic style and find it hard keeping a low profile. They usually authoritative because they have been given the power to do so and won’t hesitate to embarrass you in front of others.

SCORCHED-EARTH FIGHTER

These are people who want to be identified. They always want their victims to get hurt and feel bad. The opponents also must lose no matter what. Several cyberbullies are always in this category.

SPINELESS SUPERVISOR

These are individuals who do things that they are told to do by the management to hurt good employees. They can be ordered to get rid of good employees for unknown reasons or reasons that aren’t work-related. A spineless supervisor intimidates other workers when they air a problem rather than dealing with the problem.

SHAPE-SHIFTER

These are individuals who are not convinced easily. When you inform them about being bullied by someone at work, they find it hard to believe you. They take advantage of those who give them opportunities.

CHARACTER ASSASSIN

These are bullies who gossip and talk badly behind your back. This bully, in particular, is very dangerous because your reputation will be at risk and before you know it’s even happening; it will be too late to defend yourself.

DEALING WITH BULLIES

While there are different types of bullies, the same tactics are required to deal with them. However, what you should do is to immediately stop the bullying that moment you see it happening. Therefore, if you are dealing with a workplace bully try these steps.

Ground yourself. How you respond to the bully will make him or she react in a way that you will like or won’t like. If you show a bully that you are hurt, they will be very happy. Be calm in the face of bullying just find a way to stay calm.

Begin documenting. Take down notes of what happened and when. Write down what was said and if there’s anyone who heard or saw it.

Turn the tables. You can exchange with the bully. Try responding to abusive statements or ask them if there’s anything they would have done better to change a particular situation since they seem to know a lot of things.

Discover a champion. Your organization may have procedures on how to deal with bullies. If that’s so, don’t hesitate to report bad behavior. Your reputation may be at risk, so find out if the organization has rules and regulations. If it doesn’t, or if the bully is the person who you should report to, find another champion somewhere else who can intervene. It can a supervisor or a leader in the company.